Julius Caesar

Julius Caesar

Shakespeares Julius Caesar is one of the bards more political plays, though others like Hamlet and Henry IV also contain distinctly political perspectives. Julius Caesar is unique because the characterizations Shakespeare produces are almost subjugated to the notion of politics, the state, and the relationship between man and society. In looking at this topic, there are three major areas of consideration. First, it is important to establish the political persona of Rome, and Shakespeare presents this most eloquently in the limited development of Julius Caesar. Secondly, the relationship between Brutus and the people makes definitive points about the significance of political power. Finally, the ramifications of the actions of Cassius and Antony clearly redefine the novel away from the perspective of Brutus. Shakespeare creates his tragedy by utilizing a primarily male cast in order to create a familiar phenomenon in Rome of Caesars day–the lack of presence of women within the political structures of the day (Parker 251). This is only notable within the context of this theme because of the significant and often affectionate relationships that Shakespeare creates and the impact they have on the development of political ideals.
Although Shakespeare develops

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